Crying Out Loud

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Jun 5

Crying Out Loud catalogue now available through Blurb. £10. To order a copy click here

4 star review by Zoe Pilger in the Independent of Crying Out Loud 30/5/12
May 31

4 star review by Zoe Pilger in the Independent of Crying Out Loud 30/5/12

A Matter of Life & Death

11.00 am, Sunday 27 May 2012 
(UK 1946) Written & directed by Michael Powell 
& Emeric Pressburger 100m. (U)  
David Niven, Kim Hunter, Roger Livesey, Marius Goring.

One of the crown jewels of British cinema from the brilliant Powell and Pressburger, A Matter of Life & Death is an extraordinary innovative and spectacular fantasy with David Niven as a downed RAF fighter pilot who must justify his continuing existence to a (Technicolor) heavenly panel because he has made the mistake of falling in love with an American girl on (black-and-white) earth when he really should have been dead. A brilliantly witty script, some great performances and innovative cinematography, including time-lapse images and time freezes, combine to create a unique classic of magical and romantic movie-making.


This film screening has been programmed to complement 
Catherine Anyango & Julie Hill’s exhibition Crying Out Loud at 
Guest Projects, 1 Andrews Road, London, E8 4QL. 11–30 May 2012. 


For further information please see: 
www.cryingout.tumblr.com
www.guestprojects.com

£4/£3 Concs

Rio Cinema Dalston, 107 Kingsland High Street, London E8 2PB
May 21

A Matter of Life & Death

11.00 am, Sunday 27 May 2012 
(UK 1946) Written & directed by Michael Powell
& Emeric Pressburger 100m. (U)


David Niven, Kim Hunter, Roger Livesey, Marius Goring.

One of the crown jewels of British cinema from the brilliant Powell and Pressburger, A Matter of Life & Death is an extraordinary innovative and spectacular fantasy with David Niven as a downed RAF fighter pilot who must justify his continuing existence to a (Technicolor) heavenly panel because he has made the mistake of falling in love with an American girl on (black-and-white) earth when he really should have been dead. A brilliantly witty script, some great performances and innovative cinematography, including time-lapse images and time freezes, combine to create a unique classic of magical and romantic movie-making.

This film screening has been programmed to complement Catherine Anyango & Julie Hill’s exhibition Crying Out Loud at Guest Projects, 1 Andrews Road, London, E8 4QL. 11–30 May 2012.

For further information please see: www.cryingout.tumblr.com www.guestprojects.com

£4/£3 Concs

Rio Cinema Dalston, 107 Kingsland High Street, London E8 2PB

Platform One
May 16

Platform One

A work by Julie Hill for Crying Out Loud

Thursday, 17th May 2012, 4.50pm
Cambridge Heath Train Station, 
Hackney Road, Bethnal Green, 
London, E2 7NA
Picking up on melodramatic motifs of chance happenings, missed meetings, revelations, last minute rescues and deus ex machina endings, a couple will re-enact dialogue at Cambridge Heath Train Station from this classic tear-jerker.  

Performed by Kristoffer Hubball and Madelaine Ryan

Please join us for a post performance reception from 5.30pm at Guest Projects.

To download event flyer here
May 14

A work by Julie Hill for Crying Out Loud

Thursday, 17th May 2012, 4.50pm
Cambridge Heath Train Station,
Hackney Road, Bethnal Green,
London, E2 7NA

Picking up on melodramatic motifs of chance happenings, missed meetings, revelations, last minute rescues and deus ex machina endings, a couple will re-enact dialogue at Cambridge Heath Train Station from this classic tear-jerker.

Performed by Kristoffer Hubball and Madelaine Ryan

Please join us for a post performance reception from 5.30pm at Guest Projects.

To download event flyer here

A work by Julie Hill for Crying Out Loud.

‘Cathy’s Theme’, Wuthering Heights (1939)

Thursday 10th May, 6–9pm (PRIVATE VIEW)

Guest Projects, 1 Andrews Road, London, E8 4QL

Referencing early films, where musicians were employed in studios to create moods for actors whilst filming, Eugene Feygelson, a violinist will play this score in the gallery space, providing emotional stimulus for the gallery audience.

The score will be played in three different emotional tones at intervals throughout the evening: Romantic, Hysteric and Melancholic.

Download the event flyer here
May 7

A work by Julie Hill for Crying Out Loud.

‘Cathy’s Theme’, Wuthering Heights (1939)

Thursday 10th May, 6–9pm (PRIVATE VIEW)
Guest Projects, 1 Andrews Road, London, E8 4QL

Referencing early films, where musicians were employed in studios to create moods for actors whilst filming, Eugene Feygelson, a violinist will play this score in the gallery space, providing emotional stimulus for the gallery audience.

The score will be played in three different emotional tones at intervals throughout the evening: Romantic, Hysteric and Melancholic.



Download the event flyer here

Download the full invite here
Apr 30

Download the full invite here

Animated version of thaumatrope invitation:
Catherine Anyango, Black Bed, graphite on paper, 2012.
Julie Hill, Sudden Dialogues (extract), 2012
Apr 30

Animated version of thaumatrope invitation:
Catherine Anyango, Black Bed, graphite on paper, 2012.
Julie Hill, Sudden Dialogues (extract), 2012

Guest Projects, 1 Andrews Road, E8 4QL
Private View 10 May 2012, 6–9pm 
Exhibition continues 11–30 May 2012
Open Thurs – Sun, 12–6pm

In their upcoming exhibition, Catherine Anyango and Julie Hill take on the historical view of women as objects perpetually on the brink of hysteria – dripping with emotion, their bodies ready to overflow, blurring and overriding social norms. Using drawing, film, print, sound, sculpture, soap and water, their individual works together construct a mise-en-scène that explores the idea of the ‘unacceptable’ manifestations of emotional afflictions by actively playing with the emotions of the viewer.

New work from Julie Hill will look at theme of hysteria in relation to the representation of female emotion in melodramatic women’s films from the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s. In Sob Stories, narrative plot summaries from melodramatic films have been collected and played with to form a text that unfolds around the exhibition space while discreet interventions permeate the outside world. The interventions, comprising objects, documents and performances, carry fictional elements into reality creating a ‘middle world’ where the audience is suspended. Works include the Letter from an Unknown Woman, a Brief Encounter at a London train station and the tear that was used as evidence in a Matter of Life or Death. Julie’s work addresses the ever-increasing confluence between popular entertainment and everyday life in an attempt to provoke the audience out of a passive or complacent relationship with the forms of entertainment they consume. 

Catherine Anyango’s work aims to unsettle the viewer. A series of loosely interlinked responses to the theme of the exhibition create a sensation of repressed hysteria in a domestic environment of beds, sinks, sheets and crockery, physical environments that are disrupted by intangible emotional forces. Solid graphite drawings are drawn to almost elude your vision – you must keep changing your position relative to them in order to see. This makes them into spaces as well as drawings; three dimensional areas that you must navigate but cannot penetrate. Similarly, film pieces attempt to make a three dimensional object out of a film, a thing that invites a tactile response. Breaking Point, a life size recreation of a woman washing dishes, provides an occasional, uncomfortable soundtrack, when hands cast from soap dissolve under running water, causing plates to fall and smash, a sound signifying frustration and violence in what should be a peaceful domestic scene.

The exhibition is both a serious and light-hearted attempt to expose a prejudice against ‘feminine’ categories of entertainment such as soap operas and chick flicks, domesticity and the presence of emotion. The approach can be summarized in the title, Crying out Loud – an expression of annoyance or anger, but also an attempt to interrogate the idea of open, unashamed emotion.

An illustrated catalogue will be published to coincide with the exhibition featuring essays by Dr Volker Sommer, Evolutionary Anthropologist at UCL; Dr Chantal Faust, artist, writer and tutor in the department of Critical and Historical Studies at the Royal College of Art and playwright, novelist and poet Deborah Levy.
Mar 22

Guest Projects, 1 Andrews Road, E8 4QL
Private View 10 May 2012, 6–9pm
Exhibition continues 11–30 May 2012
Open Thurs – Sun, 12–6pm

In their upcoming exhibition, Catherine Anyango and Julie Hill take on the historical view of women as objects perpetually on the brink of hysteria – dripping with emotion, their bodies ready to overflow, blurring and overriding social norms. Using drawing, film, print, sound, sculpture, soap and water, their individual works together construct a mise-en-scène that explores the idea of the ‘unacceptable’ manifestations of emotional afflictions by actively playing with the emotions of the viewer.

New work from Julie Hill will look at theme of hysteria in relation to the representation of female emotion in melodramatic women’s films from the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s. In Sob Stories, narrative plot summaries from melodramatic films have been collected and played with to form a text that unfolds around the exhibition space while discreet interventions permeate the outside world. The interventions, comprising objects, documents and performances, carry fictional elements into reality creating a ‘middle world’ where the audience is suspended. Works include the Letter from an Unknown Woman, a Brief Encounter at a London train station and the tear that was used as evidence in a Matter of Life or Death. Julie’s work addresses the ever-increasing confluence between popular entertainment and everyday life in an attempt to provoke the audience out of a passive or complacent relationship with the forms of entertainment they consume.

Catherine Anyango’s work aims to unsettle the viewer. A series of loosely interlinked responses to the theme of the exhibition create a sensation of repressed hysteria in a domestic environment of beds, sinks, sheets and crockery, physical environments that are disrupted by intangible emotional forces. Solid graphite drawings are drawn to almost elude your vision – you must keep changing your position relative to them in order to see. This makes them into spaces as well as drawings; three dimensional areas that you must navigate but cannot penetrate. Similarly, film pieces attempt to make a three dimensional object out of a film, a thing that invites a tactile response. Breaking Point, a life size recreation of a woman washing dishes, provides an occasional, uncomfortable soundtrack, when hands cast from soap dissolve under running water, causing plates to fall and smash, a sound signifying frustration and violence in what should be a peaceful domestic scene.

The exhibition is both a serious and light-hearted attempt to expose a prejudice against ‘feminine’ categories of entertainment such as soap operas and chick flicks, domesticity and the presence of emotion. The approach can be summarized in the title, Crying out Loud – an expression of annoyance or anger, but also an attempt to interrogate the idea of open, unashamed emotion.

An illustrated catalogue will be published to coincide with the exhibition featuring essays by Dr Volker Sommer, Evolutionary Anthropologist at UCL; Dr Chantal Faust, artist, writer and tutor in the department of Critical and Historical Studies at the Royal College of Art and playwright, novelist and poet Deborah Levy.

For a full press release please click here
Mar 22

For a full press release please click here

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